Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation:

Te Kete Ipurangi
Communities
Schools

Te Kete Ipurangi user options:



English Online. Every child literate - a shared responsibility.

Conflict and war

Teacher Jacqui Lucas

 

 Year

 Level

 Duration

10 3-5 8-10 weeks

 

Achievement Objective being assessed

Learning outcomes

Poetic writing  Process and publish one piece of poetic writing.
Transactional writing  Process and publish one piece of transactional writing.
Presenting  Combine visual and verbal features to present themes and messages in poetry.

Processes

 Exploring Language  Use poetic conventions in writing poetry, then explain how it relates to our topic.

Supporting achievement objective

Learning outcomes

 Viewing  Respond to meanings and describe verbal and visual features in text.

 NCEA Link

 Assessment:

 Formative

 Achievement Standard:

 AS90052 (English 1.1): Produce creative writing.

 Achievement Standard:

 AS90053 (English 1.2): Produce formal writing.

 Achievement Standard:

 AS90059 (English 1.8): Produce a media or dramatic presentation.

 

Teacher background reading

Teaching and learning activities

 Select and adapt these learning activities to best meet the needs of your students, and to fit the time available:

Learning task 1

Learning task 2

Learning task 3

Learning task 4

Learning task 5

Assessment

NB - teachers may decide that they only need to use of 1-2 of the following assessments to best meet the needs of their programme.

Poetic writing

  1. Once familiar with the language, types, rhyme and metre used in poetry, students then write their own. They are given a selection of types to write, and from these they can select their best three to put forward for assessment. The overall topic is conflict or war, but the students can treat this however they wish.

    types (RTF 6KB)
    assessment (RTF 23KB)

War story

  1. Taking a line from the poem Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen students create their own story. This might be based on war or conflict, but needn't be strictly focused on this alone. The quote may appear at the beginning of the story, in the middle or at the end. It also might be repeated. The quote might be more than one line or less, but must fit in to the overall story.

    See War Poetry Online for the text of some Wilfred Owen poems, and World War One Poetry for some other war poets such as Sigfried Sassoon and Herbert Read.

    Students should have already been introduced to story writing as a skill, they should be aware of the drafting and editing process and be able to take the story through to publishing (see stylistic suggestions, notes on characterisation, structural suggestions and sentence patterns from the Writing for Publication unit).
    assessment (RTF 23KB)

Essay based on the film Gallipoli

  1. Having learnt the necessary verbal and visual features of a film, the students need to take all the information provided, and having taken the time to look through the film (stopped by the teacher to indicate important shots, music, sound and effects), write an essay based on this question:

    HOW DOES THE DIRECTOR OF THE FILM GALLIPOLI USE VERBAL AND VISUAL FEATURES TO GET A PARTICULAR MESSAGE ACROSS TO AN AUDIENCE?

     

  2. Students are required to think about:

    • What they think Peter Weir's message is.
    • Analyse the effects of particular camera shots, music, etc.
    • Who the audience is that Peter Weir is targeting.

     Students should have been previously taught the skills of transactional writing. They need to understand the use of formal language, paragraphing and sentence structure, introductions, topic sentences, statement, explanation and example, and conclusions. They should be aware of linking between paragraphs and how to quote when relevant.

    See:

    assessment (RTF 23KB)

Resources

Electronic

Other




Footer: